The YouTube channel “Maximum Fury” conducted a technical test of the new Cyberpunk add-on called “Phantom Liberty” on an older AMD hardware system, testing it separately on Linux and Windows 11. The Linux system, specifically the Fedora distribution called Nobara, performed significantly better, delivering 31% more frames compared to Windows 11.

The hardware used for testing included an Asrock B550 motherboard with an AMD Ryzen 5 5600 CPU and an AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT GPU from the first RDNA generation, along with 16 GB of DDR4 RAM. The CPU, RAM, and GPU were overclocked, and the system utilized undervolting to save energy costs.

When testing the game at 1080p resolution with high textures, the Linux system achieved an average of 63.72 frames per second (fps), while Windows 11 managed only 48.55 fps. This suggests that the game should run noticeably smoother on the Linux system.

  • HuddaBudda
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    1645 months ago

    A 30% increase in performance just might get gamers to switch over to the new operating system.

    Hell that is the difference between a better graphics card for some people. It’s like getting a free overclock, just for going outside your comfort zone.

    • Yote.zip
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      1215 months ago

      This is a rare and extreme case, which is probably caused by some sort of fluke in the testing method or due to a bug in the game that Linux is handling better. Usually gaming on Linux is like ~5-10% slower for GPU-bound games.

      • @Zeth0s@lemmy.world
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        5 months ago

        This is likely going to change as software support for gaming on Linux improves.

        If you consider real high performance computing, with well optimized libraries that can properly use the hardware (including GPUs), 50 % difference between windows and Linux is not really surprising. This is the reason 100% of real high performance computing is done on Linux. It is a better OS for raw performances than windows. For some tasks we are easily talking over twice the performances. It is not always the case, but not surprising at all.

        The differences clearly depend on the actual low level implementation of the code. But in general the current situation in gaming, with windows that competes with Linux on raw performances, is only due to lack of software support for gaming on Linux. As this is changing over time, we’ll see games performances greatly improve in Linux. Hopefully until the physiological surpass of windows performances.

        Currently most of gaming support on Linux is done via some kind of translation layer, that has itself an overhead. It means that the real linux performance would be even better than in all these benchmarks, if it was really possible to compare 1:1 Windows and Linux with native, well optimized code.

      • @dark_stang@beehaw.org
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        325 months ago

        This is probably more common than you’d think, at least in my anecdotal experience. Converting directx commands to vulkan commands, especially for AMD GPUs, can result in better and more consistent performance on Linux.

        • Yote.zip
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          5 months ago

          Do you have any numbers or examples of games? I know that it’s generally the case that DX9 games often have greater performance through DXVK, but DX11 and DX12 should usually be a little bit slower. Also, CPU-bound games are often faster on Linux in my experience, but it’s rare for games to be CPU-bound (MMOs etc).

          Additionally, OpenGL and Vulkan should be faster on Linux (Native or WINE+OpenGL/Vulkan), but I don’t have as much experience with them.

          Edit: I found this video which has a few standout games where Linux pulls ahead even on DX11/DX12. Hopefully that’s a sign of future trends.

          • @Lesrid@lemm.ee
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            55 months ago

            There was a tweet before the recent Cyberpunk update that essentially said “expect very high CPU utilization as we now use the whole CPU” which I thought just meant they dropped the ball somewhere.

          • @dark_stang@beehaw.org
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            45 months ago

            I haven’t done extensive testing on this as I’m just some dude. It’s been a long time since I’ve had windows running on anything, but the three that I remember are:

            • Fallout 76 - frame rate was about the same iirc. But way better input response and it didn’t crash in Linux like it did in Windows. Unsure if there were driver issues in Windows or what.
            • Borderlands 3 had a better frame rate and more stable frame pacing. But at the cost of increased loading screen time.
            • Sins of a Solar Empire Rebellion, probably a CPU bound issue with all the individual units flying around. But it ran way smoother on Linux for me than Windows, no juttering when zooming around the map or when a buttload of carriers show up.
      • @Whom@beehaw.org
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        105 months ago

        Sometimes there are also unimplemented/broken features on Linux which people don’t notice and save frames. Legit performance improvements over Windows do happen (especially on memory and cpu-limited systems) but I’d be skeptical of any particularly huge ones.

      • @MonkderZweite@feddit.ch
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        105 months ago

        Usually gaming on Linux is like ~5-10% slower for GPU-bound games.

        Or faster. Depends heavily on the game. Some things wine + dxvk does better.

      • @batmangrundies@lemmy.world
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        105 months ago

        Yeah.

        I’m personally lucky that my fav titles are CPU hogs, like ARMA 3 and X4: Foundations. Both run better under Linux.

        Cyberpunk runs great too, I’m sure once we eventually get the updated drivers for NVIDIA we’ll get Ray Recon too.

        • Beko Pharm
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          15 months ago

          X4: Foundations

          Can relate 🤓

          Only thing I’m missing is “real” head tracking. There is simply none in the Linux version and while I can map a virtual joystick driven by OpenTrack to each camera corner it’s just not the same. Sadly this is not exposed via LUA or I’d have wired up a UDP connection by now. So this feature sadly works only via Proton. Still sticking with the native Linux version though. It’s faster.

      • @Natanael@slrpnk.net
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        95 months ago

        It’s not rare for games to be a few % faster, as long as they’re using features that are well supported in Linux. If the bottleneck is something that needs heavier emulation because the native implementation isn’t available or good enough then yeah you’ll see slowdowns.

      • snooggums
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        45 months ago

        I kind of expect a patch for Windows that addresses the reason it is slower there now that they know there is a difference.

      • @OtakuAltair@lemm.ee
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        5 months ago

        On Nobara OS, I haven’t noticed any performance dip coming from windows.

        Linux Experiment on youtube found it performs ~5% better overall in games than Fedora, so that’s probably why.

    • @cronOP
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      305 months ago

      This is just one game with one particular graphics card, this might not be the same for example with nvidia cards.

      • conciselyverbose
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        85 months ago

        I’d be surprised if it is.

        I can’t see anything but something hinky with driver overhead mattering this much.

        • arefx
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          25 months ago

          SteamOS is perfect on the deck. Honestly it’s probably fine on a PC if all you do is game and browse Firefox. Obviously some games won’t run in Linux.

      • @Rykzon@discuss.tchncs.de
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        5 months ago

        Nobara is great, based on fedora so very stable and fairly up to date with many built in gaming features and no after install setup required to get gaming. https://nobaraproject.org/

        Running it for over a year now on my gaming rig and very happy

    • @sock@lemmy.world
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      -125 months ago

      linux users still coping

      nobody likes linux yall are chatting in an echo chamber. lemmy feels like a comp sci major college party lol

      • AverageDood :sanic: :blobHaj:
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        5 months ago

        And yet, Steam hardware survey shows Linux growing almost every month. By little, yes, but still growing almost every month, with Valve and Steam themselves betting more on Linux than on Windows and the Steam Deck being a thing.

        If Lemmy feels like a computer science party, tell ya what: feel free to join us, everyone’s welcome. Just don’t claim “cope and seethe” when there’s actual growth here

        • @sock@lemmy.world
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          -45 months ago

          it grew from 1% to 1.5% as a result of steam deck release? or what growth.

          ive been to enough compsci parties im not abouta indulge in pseudocode on a whiteboard thank you very much.

    • Kaldo
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      175 months ago

      Wait, DLSS doesn’t work on Linux at all? That’s a pretty big thing to gloss over whenever someone is talking about linux gaming and how comparable it is to windows nowadays. I doubt I’d be able to get anything remotely close to a stable framerate on cyberpunk2077 without it, and same goes for other newer games like dying light 2 or starfield!

      • kadu
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        485 months ago

        DLSS works. It took a while longer than Windows, but Nvidia themselves actually provide Wine-compatible DLL files. Also, there’s a native way to implement DLSS for Linux which, I kid you not, zero games so far are using. The Windows version works fine though.

        But DLSS Frame Generation and Ray Reconstruction do not work, and there are zero workarounds.

        • Kaldo
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          165 months ago

          Oh, so he’s just talking about DLSS3 features, gotchya. I thought DLSS 1 performance improvements are also frame generation but I see now thats different

          • deadcream
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            75 months ago

            DLSS is upscaler. Game is rendered at lower resolution and then image is upscaled in a bit smarter way than simple “stretching”.

            • kadu
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              75 months ago

              More precisely, DLSS is a set of models that use AI to interpolate an image. This interpolation can take many different forms:

              Interpolation can be used to take a lower resolution image and upscale it, which is the main feature of DLSS.

              You can also use DLSS to take a high resolution image and scale it down, with less artifacts, as a type of antialiasing. This is DLDSR.

              You can also use it to take information from an image, combined with motion data, and interpolate how blocks of pixels might change into a new frame. This allows you to generate intermediary frames. This is Frame Generation.

              You can also take a very noisy image, composed of discrete dots, and interpolate how neighboring pixels should look. This is Ray Reconstruction.

        • arefx
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          5 months ago

          Aren’t frame generation and ray reconstruction new? I’m sure they’ll work one day, although I’m not a big Linux head I only use steamos on the deck I just see a lot of Linux posts on Lemmy so here I am lol.

          • kadu
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            25 months ago

            They’re new, yes. Though the folks at Proton already confirmed they’ll provide no workaround to support it, Nvidia needs to build the Linux drivers with official support. We don’t know if they’ll do that and when.

      • Lupec
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        115 months ago

        Plain DLSS definitely works, I’m guessing they mean that specific reconstruction feature. I’m sure it’ll be implemented eventually if it’s possible at all though.
        Side note, a kind of related feature that is missing for sure from the Linux drivers is DLDSR, and plain DSR for that matter. As a heavy user of both, it’s a bit of a personal deal breaker.

      • fazo96
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        65 months ago

        DLSS works fine on Linux, but I don’t know about frame generation and ray reconstruction specifically. It could be those two don’t work yet.

    • @rush@lemm.ee
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      45 months ago

      DLSS is a matter of Nvidia’s sub-par driver support. FSR2 (and soon FSR3, which does frame gen.) works, ironically even on Nvidia GPUs :P

        • @rush@lemm.ee
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          15 months ago

          I only took FSR3 for reference because it’ll support one of the things you outlined xP

    • @Molecular0079@lemmy.world
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      25 months ago

      DLSS ray reconstruction works in Linux. You just need to launch with DXVK_NVAPI_DRIVER_VERSION=53799 VKD3D_CONFIG=dxr11 %command%.

      • kadu
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        5 months ago

        I was (happily!) wrong. See reply below.

        • @Molecular0079@lemmy.world
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          5 months ago

          No, it’s definitely working. Here’s proof (open the images in a new tab and zoom in on the reflections to see the difference in clarity):

          With reconstruction:

          Without reconstruction:

          With reconstruction:

          Without reconstruction:

          With DXVK_NVAPI_DRIVER_VERSION=53799 and ray reconstruction enabled, reflections are much clearer and also resolve way faster during motion.

            • @Molecular0079@lemmy.world
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              35 months ago

              Could you tell me how to use these arguments?

              Sure thing! Right click on any game in Steam and click Properties. Then in the General tab, you’ll see a Launch Options box where you can paste these arguments in.

              What most people get wrong when first trying to use it is not knowing how to correctly specify environment variables vs launch options that get passed to the game executable. If you just want to pass arguments to the game, just paste them into the box. So for example with Cyberpunk, you can just paste in

              --launcher-skip
              

              and Steam will launch the game as if you were running

              Cyberpunk2077.exe --launcher-skip
              

              However, if you want to specify environment variables as well, you’ll need the %command% placeholder. So, in order to enable raytracing and bypass the driver check for ray reconstruction in Cyberpunk, I paste these launch arguments into the settings:

              DXVK_NVAPI_DRIVER_VERSION=53799 VKD3D_CONFIG=dxr11 %command% --launcher-skip
              

              which is like running

              DXVK_NVAPI_DRIVER_VERSION=53799 VKD3D_CONFIG=dxr11 Cyberpunk2077.exe --launcher-skip
              

              %command% is just a placeholder for the game’s executable path.

              Hope that clears things up with regards to the launch options.

              As far as knowing which environment variables to use, that’s on a game-by-game basis, but the two most common ones that I use for Nvidia GPUs are PROTON_ENABLE_NVAPI=1 which enables DLSS in games that are not on Proton’s NVAPI whitelist, and VKD3D_CONFIG=dxr11 which enables raytracing. I almost never bother with any other environment variables unless there’s special game issues I need to workaround (like Cyberpunk’s driver version check), in which case I check ProtonDB or the game’s issue tracker on the Proton GitHub page.

    • @Psythik@lemm.ee
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      -65 months ago

      Also no HDR, either (not supported by the OS). You’re not getting the full Cyberpunk experience without HDR and Ray Reconstruction. But I suppose that people with an older PC and monitor would benefit by switching to Linux.

      • @PraiseTheSoup@lemm.ee
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        -125 months ago

        I already got the full cyberpunk experience 3 years ago, and it was terrible. Making the game prettier doesn’t make it any less of a joke.

        • @Psythik@lemm.ee
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          45 months ago

          I used to say things like this too, but then I played 2.0.

          Surprisingly it’s a proper game now. They turned the game into GTA in the future, and that’s a good thing. Also the perk system was completely overhauled, and weapons rebalanced so that you actually have to do more than just grab whatever has the highest DPS.

          The story’s the same, but everything else is completely different. Give it another chance.

          • @PraiseTheSoup@lemm.ee
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            -45 months ago

            I’ve tried it. It absolutely is not “GTA in the future”. It’s just as shallow as it was at launch.

    • Rustmilian
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      125 months ago

      Possible, but looking through the footage it seems everything is being rendered as expected.

    • @rush@lemm.ee
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      105 months ago

      It won’t just not render something. DXVK is already a finished thing in that regard. Complete enough that Intel uses it for legacy DirectX support in their ARC GPUs even.

      • @MooseBoys@lemmy.world
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        95 months ago

        It’s entirely possible that the translation layer will alter timing to expose a race condition such that something doesn’t render.

        • @rush@lemm.ee
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          5 months ago

          For that Theres VKD3D :P

          Also, I specifically said legacy DirectX because the support DX11 and DX12 natively.

          • Rustmilian
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            5 months ago

            But that’s not exactly relevant.
            DXVK 2.2 added D3D11On12 which could probably then be used by VKD3D or D3D12 so I suppose it does support DX12 indirectly.
            However DXVK itself doesn’t support DX12 native games like Cyberpunk 2077.

  • @NBJack@reddthat.com
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    325 months ago

    Windows 11 is trash. Microsoft kept boasting it was “faster” than 10, but it is (unsurprisingly?) heavy in some weird areas, including a less snappy start menu, more telemetry, invasive integration with their software, you name it. Tried one machine in my collection to try it via an upgrade (a Microsoft Surface Pro 6), and the performance was so bad I ended up going back to Windows 10. Multi-second lag just to get to the program shortcuts is a really bad sign.

    • @clanginator@lemmy.world
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      35 months ago

      Strange, I’ve had the opposite experience. I remember early on 11 was really bad and buggy in general so I waited to move my main install, but it’s been fantastic for me on laptop and desktop.

      Granted, I’m very particular about my Windows installs and know how to clean everything up pretty well, so I have no idea how out of box experience compares, but at least with how I use it, 11 has been fantastic, performance has been much more consistent, I don’t need to reboot as often, and it lasted way longer before I felt the need for a fresh install than any of my 10 installations.

      I still have certain things I’m not able to entirely fix that bug me (still searching for a way to remove the stupid Office 365 ad from the settings homepage) that weren’t in Windows 10, but the settings in 11 are overall SO much better, window snapping is way better, explorer is way better, HDR support is way better, multi-monitor support is better, default apps in general are better, it’s becoming easier to remove built-in apps you don’t want, and just a whole bunch of small QOL changes and updated, more consistent styling, it’s just a much nicer OS to use at this point.

      If you haven’t tried it yet, Tiny11 23H2 just came out, and while there’s still some stuff I fixed after installation, it does an excellent job of trimming most of the fat off Win11 without sacrificing usability. You can use Windows update like normal (and you’ll have to update after install) but it may be worth another try if you haven’t tried 11 recently. IMO it’s a really nice upgrade over 10 if you can fix all the little annoyances like the new right-click and such. (BloatyNosy on GitHub is what I use post-install, in addition to a few powershell commands and such)

      • @NBJack@reddthat.com
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        14 months ago

        I don’t doubt you cleaned up it up well. But you are the exception rather than the rule for experiencing Windows 11.

        The absolute shitfest that is the incessant integration with Bing and other online only tech is the biggest problem. If you have muscle memory like I do to start button + type keyword for a program + enter, it is unbearably slow to respond at times for the search to catch up. Or my new favorite, getting ready to hit enter, only to have it change the current selection right before.

        And this is to say nothing of the critical settings you can no longer directly control or are just broken. Want to change the power profile of your laptop? Buried. Want to get an estimate on your battery time remaining? Better open the registry. Want to switch your background? Well, roll the dice on that high resolution PNG you just created; unlike 10, 11 fails on some backgrounds of certain filetypes if they’re over a certain size (try a detailed PNG over 3000x4000). Just want a plain old Documents directory that isn’t integrated with OneDrive? Happy hunting; turning it off ain’t enough anymore.

    • Wrench Wizard
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      25 months ago

      Damn, you know what? I actually sort of liked windows 11 when I had it on an empty SSD but now that I’ve added all my software I’ve noticed it’s much less snappy than win10 was.

      Now I’m thinking of down(upgrading) back to windows 10 but Feel like it’s going to be a hassle. I’m not as tech savvy as I used to be and can’t even recall how to go back to win10 without just installing it fresh

  • euphoric.cat
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    295 months ago

    had the same results, now this. 60fps on windows, about 85 on linux.

  • @Swiggles@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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    5 months ago

    It is just unfortunate that it does not run on Nvidia hardware. The benchmark runs if you disable all RTX features, but it crashes on a new game before you even have full control of the character.

    Looking at protondb it looks like all people with Nvidia have issues since the 2.0 update. I hope there will be some fix soon. I don’t want to replace the GPU yet it would be a waste (2080 Super).

    For now I am playing it on my Steam Deck instead.

    • visnudeva
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      5 months ago

      I don’t know what you’re talking about, It run very well on my Nvidia GPU on Linux before and after the patch and DLC.

      • @Swiggles@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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        75 months ago

        Create a new character, select corporate start and once the other person enters the room the game crashes just for the easiest 100% reproducible crash. Other people have the same problems and even if they get past that (different game start) it still frequently crashes due to Nvidia driver bugs as far as I understand it.

        If it works so well for you what’s your setup? I heard some older Nvidia cards might work better.

        • @cpw@lemmy.ca
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          95 months ago

          Downgrade to the 510 Nvidia driver. Runs absolutely solid on my rtx2080. It should be noted that this crash seems to be quite correlated to the rtx20x0 cards - my speculation is that something about dlss is a bit borked on them since they’re the first dlss 2+ cards. It’s not even exclusively Linux either, reports indicate that there’s some sort of overlay (I blame the call overlay myself) that is tanking fps on windows as well. The 510 driver works great because dlss isn’t available for it as I understand it.