I have a public SMB share mainly as a media dump. Everyone can read and write, without any auth - as intended. However, if I copy files via SSH (as a regular user, not the samba user), these files are of course owned by that user and thus not writable for the samba user - so I can’t touch these files via SMB.

My config looks like this

[public]
  path = /path/to/samba/public
  guest ok = yes
  writeable = yes
  browseable = yes
  create mask = 0664
  directory mask = 0775
  force user = sambapub
  force group = users

I can fix the permissions by simply chown/chmod all files, but that’s not really a solution.

  • lazynooblet
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    5 months ago

    Add the sticky group bit to the directory so that new files are created with the group of the directory.

    chmod 2775 /path/to/samba/public```
    
    Now any new file will have group "users".
  • @jdnewmil@lemmy.ca
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    65 months ago

    Samba is a pipe of sorts… those settings only apply to files created using that pipe.

    SSH is a different pipe, with different configuration. I think you need to modify the umask of the user connecting via ssh and/or add them to a samba group.

    • AggressivelyPassiveOP
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      15 months ago

      umask seems to only set the permissions, not the ownership. But ownership seems to be necessary to delete files.

        • AggressivelyPassiveOP
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          15 months ago

          The user is in that group, but files are (by default) owned by the user (that is, the group of the same name as the user, I’m not sure, what the wording is).

          However, at least it seems to currently work somewhat. I had to chown and umask the entire share, and then restart the machine. Maybe some dangling session interfered?

  • @nyan@lemmy.cafe
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    55 months ago

    Untested Evil Method, Not Really Recommended: format the backing file system in vfat, which has no notion of file ownership.

  • @Nibodhika@lemmy.world
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    25 months ago

    I’m not 100% sure on this, but there’s a config in the general which tells samba which user to use, if none is defined it uses nobody. I assume that if you change that to the same user you use via SSH it should work.

    That being said, what you’re seeing is expected, it’s complaining that you copied files as user A to a public directory and now user B can’t delete them unless user A sets the files as read/write for everyone (chmod) or transfers ownership (chown). There’s a thing called ACL’s that should allow you to set the permissions to the same as the parent folder so you can have everything be 777, but I’ve never used it so can’t really help, however with the name you should be able to find some examples on the internet.

    • AggressivelyPassiveOP
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      35 months ago
        force user = sambapub
        force group = users
      

      This should set the user, and it’s exactly what I’m seeing if I copy files over via smb. I’m aware, that it’s kind if expected, but not what is intended (by me).

      • @Nibodhika@lemmy.world
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        15 months ago

        Are you using the sambapub user to SSH the files into the folder? I thought that the force user refered to a samba user, not a Linux user.

  • smoof
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    15 months ago

    My hacky way was to make sure group ID on each computer matches and have the directory writable by the group. I also make sure user ID is different so I can identify who created it. It was easy for me because I only have to worry about 2 computers plus my NAS.